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Route 66 Attractions in the Western U. S.

Get Your Kicks at These Route 66 Attractions

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For some travelers, Route 66 is the raison d'etre for their vacation, while others simply enjoy a few Route 66 sights along the way. The "route" that Route 66 followed changed over the years, particularly in New Mexico, where 1925's sinuous 506 miles were shortened to 399 miles in 1937. Today's Interstate 40 roughly follows the same route as Historic Route 66 through New Mexico and Arizona to Barstow, California. Many places along the original routes have erected brown-and-white Historic Route 66 signs to guide your journey.

Route 66 in the Texas Panhandle

Texas Route 66 sights include the “Cadillac Ranch,” Wildorado,

Route 66 in New Mexico

Highlights along Route 66 in New Mexico include Gallup's "motel row," Albuquerque's vintage neon and Tucumcari's lovely murals.

Classic Route 66 Neon in Albuquerque's Nob Hill

These great old neon signs have been lighting up Route 66 for decades.

Route 66 in Arizona

Some folks say Arizona has the best-preserved section of Old Route 66 in the United States.

Route 66 in Williams, Arizona

On October 13th, 1984, Williams became the last bypassed town along the "Mother Road," as old Highway 66 became Interstate 40. Today, all of downtown Williams is on the National Register of Historic Places, and its main street is one of the most enjoyable Route 66 attractions in the West.

Route 66 in California: Needles to Santa Monica

Route 66 sights in California include Amboy, the "ghost towns" section, motor courts in Barstow and the Wigwam Motel in San Bernardino. Use this guide to follow the Mother Road through the Los Angeles metro area, along the country's first freeway and all the way to the Pacific Ocean.

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